Pastor’s Blog

Located in the town of Vineland, Ontario, we are a small, friendly,  inter-generational church in the Anabaptist tradition that worships God and together seeks to follow Jesus’ example.   We have a long history—we were the first Mennonite church in Canada.  On this site you can learn about the people and the work of our church, find directions to our facility, and learn about our history.  You are welcome to join us!

Worship Service at 11:00 Sunday mornings (10:30 a.m. 1st Sunday in July through Labour Day)  Sunday School for all ages begins at 10:00, except in summer.  Hope to see you there!

Pot-luck lunch usually on the first Sunday of the month (except in July/Aug)

3557 Rittenhouse Rd, Vineland (see directions page for details)
 

We look forward to meeting you!

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Wrongs to Rights

This Sunday, we kick off a month-long exploration into a discussion that affects all of us.  For the next few weeks, we’re going to look into one of the moments in history when church was not at its best.  And we need to hear this truth.

The recent Truth and Reconciliation Commission Report, published in 2015, details just how much churches participated in the systemic cultural genocide of First Nations people across the country of Canada.  And this doesn’t include just particular denominations or particular churches.  It largely includes all of us who were doing church in Canada over the last 200-300 years.

But we believe there is hope.  Hope both for our First Nations brothers and sisters and for the church.  The TRC is a step forward in hope.  Now, the next step is for us to listen, learn,and discern how we will respond to the evidence of history.

This Sunday, Tom Neufeld will share with us on some of the history behind the church’s colonialism and exploitation of First Nations peoples, and he will share this within the context of stories within the Bible itself where people of faith decided that it was okay to harm and exclude a particular race or group of people.

To get the conversation started, here’s a video from Mennonite Church Canada connected to the TRC sessions that took place in Montreal in 2013.  We think this will be of great value for you to check out before we begin on Sunday

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Why does God make it so hard to reach heaven?

Continuing on our list of questions from our Googling for God series, this is one of the questions that we received online.

I think this raises one particular question for me.

What is your assumption about getting to heaven? In other words, what exactly are you under the impression that it takes to get to heaven?

I think if I knew the answer to this question, I could likely best answer you. But unfortunately, we don’t have the opportunity to go back-and-forth for clarity. So, I think I’ll make an assumption here that is fairly common when I converse people on this topic: we get to heaven by performing enough good deeds and avoiding enough bad deeds.

Christians have often believed this assumption. We have often said that we have to do the right things, avoid enough of the wrong things, wear the right clothes, hang out with the right people, avoid the wrong people, and do enough of these things in order to get to heaven.

In fact, this assumption is fairly common amongst many spiritual and religious views. For some of us, we believe we have to follow all of the right laws and not break any of those laws. For some of us, we must prove that we are a good person by performing enough good deeds or acts of kindness.  For others, if we perform enough spiritual rituals or acts, then God will accept us.

Most of these views predicate themselves on the action and the work of the believer. It’s up to the believer to get him or herself to heaven.

So long as our arrival in heaven depends on our personal efforts, it is going to feel hard. Will I ever be good enough? How do I know that I am good enough? What if I’m deceived into thinking I’m good enough? Will I ever be able to do everything that God demands of me?

In this situation, it IS hard to reach heaven!

Many faiths and religions run under the assumption that heaven is like a mountain. We’re all trying to be good enough to reach the top and avoid any bad things that may drag us down.

But here’s the thing that’s interesting in the Christian story: God comes down from the mountain and lifts humanity up to the top.

Christianity seems to suggest that when Jesus dies on the cross and is resurrected, he removes any and all need for us to perform ritual sacrifices, say and do the right things, and earn our way into heaven. Instead, it is all done for us.

Paul says this in Romans 3: 27-28: “Can we boast, then, that we have done anything to be accepted by God? No, because our acquittal [another way of saying reaching heaven] is not based on our good deeds. It is based on our faith. So we are made right with God through faith and not by obeying the law.”

When he’s asked by some of his followers what he expects them to do in order to be saved or reach heaven, Jesus says, “This is what God wants you to do: Believe in the one he has sent.”

I can understand why you may be under the assumption that you have to work to earn your way to heaven. That’s a pretty common assumption. But maybe you need to hear the Good News that God came down from the mountain and paid the price, so you don’t have to worry about earning enough to make your way to heaven.

Now, you simply have to trust and believe that God has done this for you; and see what life looks like when you live in that reality.

I think Jesus means it when he says in Matt. 11: 28-30: “Come to me, all of you who are weary and carry heavy burdens, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you. Let me teach you, because I am humble and gentle, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke fits perfectly, and the burden I give you is light.”

I hope that’s Good News to you today!

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Does God Change With Time?

I think you could actually break this down into two questions:

1. Does God change with time?

No, the Bible seems to say that God is eternal and unchanging. In Malachi 3:6, God says, “I am the Lord, and I do not change.” (NLT). Abraham and Moses both refer to God as the “eternal” god (Gen. 21:33, Deut. 33: 27), and Paul certainly picks up that theme in Romans 1:20 where he refers to God’s “eternal power.”

However, I think a good second question would be:

2. Does our relationship with God change over time?

In this case, emphatically yes! Paul says in Gal. 3: 24-25, “The law was our guardian and teacher to lead us until Christ came. So now, through faith in Christ, we are made right with God. But now that faith in Christ has come, we no longer need the law as our guardian.” (NLT)

 A pretty scandalous statement for a Pharisee and expert in the Law of Moses to make!

Paul seems to suggest that the Torah or Law in the Old Testament (with all of its guidelines about what to eat, what to wear, how to relate with people, etc.) was given to the Jewish people (and incidentally to the world) for a time as a way to show us what is right and wrong; as a way to show us what God wants us to do.

But now Paul seems to say that we have changed. We have grown up, so to speak. For a time, the law was given to us to act like a guardian or a babysitter; telling us when to go to sleep, don’t eat too much candy, etc. But now, because we can place our faith in Christ, we no longer need the law as our guardian.

Paul seems to suggest that in Christ, we mature in our faith, and living out love as Jesus teaches will actually fulfill all of the requirements of the law. (Matt. 22: 34-40)

Love will now allow us to maturely live out the principles that were given to us in the law.

When we are 5 years old, we need to be told when to go to bed. We need to be told don’t eat too much chocolate or we’ll be sick. We need that sort of guidance at that age. However, try telling a 20-year old when to go to bed!

Hopefully by 20 years of age, we’ve learned why it’s healthy to get a lot of sleep, and we don’t need to be told when to go to bed.  In fact, if we try to live by the same rules at the age of 20 as we did when we were 5, it will actually be harmful to us and to others!

Now, if you are the parent of a child such as this, and you change how you relate to your child, does that mean you have necessarily changed? Certainly not! But your relationship with your child has changed because time has passed and they have grown.

This is what the Bible seems to suggest has happened in our own spirituality.

In the Bible, we have an Old Testament and a New Testament. We have an old way of relating to God and a new way of relating to God. We have an old way of living by religious rules and regulations, and a new way of living by the principle of love that Christ teaches.

But the eternal, unchanging God is the same parent behind both ways of relating.

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Trump, the Pax Romana, and Palm Sunday

This Sunday, many churches around the world, including our own, will take time to remember and honour Palm Sunday: the moment when Jesus enters into Jerusalem and begins the events prior to his arrest and crucifixion.

Two particular things happen on Palm Sunday: Jesus rides a donkey colt, and a number of people wave palm branches and shout, “Hosanna!  Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord.”

The symbol of riding on a donkey colt was meant to conjure up the image of a King riding into Jerusalem.  Solomon rides on a mule when he is anointed as King over all of Israel.  Zechariah also prophesies that when the long-awaited Messiah, the great King of Zion, will enter Jerusalem “riding on a donkey’s colt” (Zech. 9:9).

The addition of palm branches is interesting.  Palm branches were already a common symbol of royalty in Jewish culture at the time; but palm branches were particularly connected to when the King entered the Temple and performed a sacrifice upon the altar.

Palm Sunday is a celebration of Jesus’ triumphal entry as a King into Jerusalem and we see two things quickly emerge in this image of Jesus: 1) the donkey colt was also a symbol of humility and 2) Jesus is going to be a King performing a sacrifice.  But instead of sacrificing an animal on the altar, he sacrifices himself upon the cross to heal the world of its sins.

Now try lining up this image of King with that we see quickly emerging in our beloved Donald J. Trump.  As a leader or ruler, Trump says things like:

“We will have so much winning if I get elected that you may get bored with winning. Believe me.”

[Speaking of a protester] “I want to punch him in the face.”

“If you see somebody getting ready to throw a tomato, knock the crap out of ’em, would you? Seriously. Okay?”

“See, in the good old days this didn’t use to happen [people protesting], because they used to treat them very rough. We’ve become very weak.”

When asked about the recent assault of a protester who was subsequently manhandled by three police officers (not the man who actually assaulted him), Trump says, “He deserved it. The next time we see him, we might have to kill him. We don’t know who he is. He might be with a terrorist organization.”

Trump represents what we could call the Pax Romana or “Peace of Rome.”  Just before the birth of Christ until about 180 A.D., Rome enjoyed about a relative peace for about 200 years.  Their claim was that the civilization and military expansion of the Roman Empire had engineered this peace.

However, the Pax Romana was anything but peaceful.  The Empire engaged in widespread torture and executions in order to maintain power over oppressed cultures, and it still engaged in warfare.  It just didn’t have any major civil wars during this time or any major opponents who threatened the stability of the Empire.

But the basic concept of the Pax Romana was that physical force and violence against your enemies creates security and peace.

This is what Donald Trump believes will happen when he uses physical and verbal force against protesters.  This is also what also lead Trump to say things like: “The other thing with the terrorists is you have to take out their families, when you get these terrorists, you have to take out their families.”

This was the logic of the Pax Romana.  Use whatever physical force is necessary in order to ensure peace.

Two different leaders.  Two different concepts of “King.”  One leader advocates that because he is so rich and powerful, he will make America great again.  The other leader rides on a donkey colt to announce his arrival.

One leader says you have to sacrifice people on the altar of peace and security in order to be safe.  The other leader sacrifices himself to save the world.

This Palm Sunday let’s ask ourselves “What is truly the peace that we want for the world? And which kind of King will we ultimately follow?”

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Live Love

Just in case you missed our service this past Sunday, here is the video that we showed at the end of our sermon The Road to Undying Love, which you can also check out on our Sermons page.

On Sunday, we talked about how when Jesus washes the feet of his followers, this is God showing the full extent of his love.  Here, a gentleman goes out on the street to wash the feet of strangers or just anyone passing by, and he combines it with various quotes from Jesus and from the Bible in order to illustrate how this act exemplifies and summarizes everything God wanted to show us about love through Christ.  Enjoy!

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What does God think about people who have lost their faith?

We just finished our sermon series Googling for God.  Check out any of the sermons for that series on our Sermons page.

Over the course of that series, I invited people in our community to submit their own questions about God these days; and just this past week, I took some time to try and address a few of those questions.

But it was near impossible to get to all of them!  So over the next few weeks, I’m going to try and address any remaining questions we received, right here on our blog.  With that, let’s jump to the first question!

What does God think about people who have lost their faith?

I think our best principles for this question come from the 15th chapter of Luke’s Gospel. Check it out for yourself, and see what you think.

This is storytelling Jesus at his best; using illustrations and case studies in order to make a point. The wonderful thing about stories and illustrations is that they convey principles which we can apply to a wide range of possibilities, rather than a hard and fast rule that can seem very limited. But enough about that!

Jesus seems to suggest three different points in three different stories of separation here:

  • God goes out of his way to pursue one person who may have left relationship with him; and he does so with joy, not anger.
  • God would search everywhere for even one person who may have left relationship with him; and again, he does so with joy, and not anger.
  • God runs out to meet even one person who may have left relationship with him, and he throws a huge party afterwards.

The three motifs that Jesus uses here are a shepherd looking for one of his sheep, a woman searching for a valuable coin, and a father running out to meet his long-lost son. In all three motifs, it is God’s activity that completes the restoration of relationship, not something we do to earn it. And each motif seems to suggest that God believes we are useful to him, we have worth to him, and we are his children.

So I would say that according to Jesus, God seems to exhibit love, compassion, and grace towards people who have lost their faith.

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The Science of Sabbath: Meeting the Expectations of the Land

Situated in the heart of the Niagara Region, our church has a lot of farmers.  Farming has a long history at The First Mennonite Church.  In honour of them, here’s a recent talk that was delivered at Canadian Mennonite University by Scientist-in-Residence, Dr. Marvin Entz.  It’s a lengthy talk, so set aside an hour and a half to watch it.  But you might enjoy hearing how Dr. Entz speaks on how to understand what Sabbath looks like in modern agriculture. What happens when we give up some control? When we allow the Land to be itself? When we allow it freedom from our inventiveness?

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