Our daily bread

The strangest bread I ever ate was made for me in a little restaurant at the side of a winding highway in northern Israel this past summer.  We were in the Golan Heights, the hilly country traditionally occupied by the cultural group known as the Druze.  The restaurant was packed.  We lined up with everyone else, and I craned my neck to see what we were standing in line for.  There were two women working hard behind a counter.  One was making big pieces of thin bread over a large grill.  She poured the batter and then at the exact moment it was ready, she whisked it over to the counter next to her.  There another women spread labneh, a yogourt cheese on it, sprinkled it with spices, and then wrapped it up in a napkin.

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As travellers, you become very aware of the need for food. You can’t just go into your kitchen and make it.  When I travelled as a young woman with a backpack and a map, one of the biggest tasks each day was finding a place to get food.  On this trip, we had a leader, and we looked to him to find us good places to eat.  He brought us to this Druze restaurant, and we were not disappointed.

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This Sunday we will be talking about  the phrase “Give us this day our daily bread”.    Why is that a hard prayer for us to pray, when it addresses one of the most universal needs that we have?

This Sunday we will also be having a “bread themed potluck” (including gluten free bread)…people are bringing anything that goes on bread!  We hope that you can join us!

This week’s prayer:  Give us this day our daily bread!

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